The Hexacoto

Listening to the sound of one hand clapping

Category: Nonsequitur

Balance Your Chicken

Sometimes, you just gotta lighten up and take a break and create pointless, stupid stuff. I had been on the train, on my phone, extracting bridges from songs for future use on short video clips like these when suddenly the caption “Fried chicken can be part of a balanced diet too!” popped into my head. And as a fan of Cibo Matto, the idea of for this video clip came to fruition.

And I realise I’m no stranger to creating stupid things to make sense of life.

I probably made this back in 2008 or 2009. There were a bunch of other clips from that same filming session that I am not releasing because they’re very cringeworthy.

In desperate times, superheroes resort to… MMA?

As commented on by Deadspin,

I don’t have any information or context to provide to help you make sense of how this video came to be. The best I can do is this message board thread that has live play-by-play of the action, but it isn’t necessarily all that helpful. (“No one in the crowd. Including us, know what the fucks going on. Before you start shouting ‘staged’. I can confirm they arnt. The fights are SO bad that they couldn’t possibly been choreographed.”) Anyway, I think that’s for the best. You should be able to enjoy Spider-Man beating the absolute shit out of Batman and Robin without having to think about what you’re watching.

At least the Spiderman retains his cocky nature. The Batman and Robin were just so… underwhelming. Especially Batman. He seems underfed. Somebody give that man a burger.

I’d rather take Batusi Batman at this point.

What’s in a name? Government regulation, that’s what

I was researching names that have fallen into disuse, and suddenly the regulation of names came up in the search. I decided to look up how China and Japan regulates what names are permitted for newborns, trying to find out what is or isn’t permitted.

China

Apparently there’s no restriction to what names can be used, as long as a computer is able to reproduce the character. Thus, according to Wikipedia, “(it) is not illegal to name a child after a famous celebrity, company, or product, as copyright and trademark laws do not apply to personal names.”

However, while there are over 70,000 Chinese characters available to choose from, only 32,232 are supported for computer input. Thus people with characters that fall outside of this 32,232 have names that run into problems when these people try to register for ID.

Japan

Japan takes a more stringent approach to naming one’s newborn, and restricts character usage based on readability and taste. “Only kanji which appear on the official list may be used in given names. This is intended to ensure that names can be readily written and read by those literate in Japanese. Rules also govern names considered to be inappropriate; for example, in 1993 two parents who tried to name their child Akuma (悪魔, which literally means “devil”) were prohibited from doing so after a massive public outcry.”

 

Protip: On “cnidaria” pronunciation

Pacific Sea Nettles, a scyphozoa, one of the four groups of Cnidaria (Image: Wikipedia)

If ever, when on the discussion of jellyfish, and the discussion moves to the topic of “cnidaria” and its related “cnidocyte,” the explosive cell mechanism by which they sting, containing the sub-cellular organelle called “cnidocyst,” and one is ever tempted to pronounce the “C” in the word;

Don’t.

Cnidaria –  /naɪˈdɛəriə/ (nai-DEH-uh-RI-uh)

Cnidocyte – /’naɪdoʊsaɪt/ (NAI-doh-site)

Cnidocyst – /’naɪdoʊsɪst/ (NAI-doh-sist)

Just sayin’.

Wolfram-dex

wolframalpha-pikachu-2013-10-18_1729Wolfram Alpha, computational search engine, has always been known to be able to draw Pokemon curves, but now, with the iPhone’s Siri integration, one can truly use the Siri as a Pokedex.

pokedex-siri[1]You could use it to find out not only useful things about the game itself, but also very important numerical facts, such as “How many Bidoofs would it take to reach the moon?”

bidoof-height[1]Would sure be more useful than any current use of Siri, in my opinion.

BOJIO

bojioAnother in Singapore would be familiar with the vernacular “Bojio,” derived from the Hokkien dialect word 没招. It’s used to signify when one does something and fails to invite his or her friend along, whereby the friend goes, “Eh! Bojio!”

The above character is completely fictional, of course. Chinese orthography cannot represent two words with a single character, but it quite funny. Taken from somewhere on Twitter.

 

Mario the heartless